My beet recipes



Horseradish and Beets Relish

November 3rd, 2012 in Salad Recipes, Sauces & Dips & Spreads by Julia Volhina

Yuriy calls this relish, made of horseradish and beets, Ukrainian wasabi: it is sharp and flavorful and goes great with meat dishes, sausages, jellied meat.

In Ukraine it is often served on Christmas and New Year.

Fresh horseradish can be tricky to handle – vapors may irritate nose and eyes, especially when chopped. That is why using blender or food processor is the best choice here.

Steaks Marinated in Onion Juice

September 1st, 2012 in Beef, Main Dish Recipes by Julia Volhina

A simple recipe to marinate steaks for a cookout: onion juice tenderizes meat without draining its own juices and no need to clean onions themselves as if you would need to do when marinating meat with chopped onions.

I used only salt and ground black pepper as seasonings this time, but other spices can be used to your taste: bay leaf, allspice, paprika, whole peppercorns, whatever you like.

Any meat cut will work here, more lean meats may require more time for marinating.

Russian Vinaigrette Salad (Salad Vinegret)

June 9th, 2012 in Salad Recipes by Julia Volhina

Vinaigrette salad (or salad “vinegret” how it is called in russian) is traditional salad of russian cuisine.

It is made of boiled vegetables (beets, potatoes and carrots), onions, sauerkraut and cucumbers pickled in salt.

Some recipes call for peas instead of boiled beans, some others skip beans all together. But to me real vinegret is the one with beans.

Traditionally this salad is dressed with sunflower oil, but it can be substituted with other oil to your taste.

Easier Borscht with Precooked Beets and Beans

December 18th, 2010 in Hot Soups, Soup Recipes by Julia Volhina

One of the challenges when cooking classic beet root soup, borscht, is to get all vegetables (and there are quite few) cooked till perfect readiness at the same time.

Considering different vegetables require different cooking time it is sometimes hard to achieve. For borscht you need to make sure beens are soft, while potatoes are not over cooked and beets don’t lose their color.

So, to make this happen: I cook beens in a separate cooking pot (just until they are soft and ready), cook beets skin on (like for salad) in separate pot in advance, and add these two to the main cooking pot at appropriate times.

By the way, using of canned beets and beens instead of cooking them yourself is an option (which I never did, but it may safe you some time).

Beet Salad with Prunes and Walnuts

November 13th, 2010 in Salad Recipes by Julia Volhina

Beet salad with prunes, walnuts and onions dressed up with mayo or sour cream or both is one of the traditional salads of ukrainian cuisine.

Also, this dish is one of the not many dishes which uses beets as a main ingredient.

It is very important to use sweet and rich red color beets for this salad. So, when buying beets scratch their skin with a nail: dark red pulp under skin is a sign of good beet, not pink and not white.

It is also important to use good quality walnuts; taste before you buy them: old walnuts can be bitter and using such will make you salad taste bitter as well.

Lithuanian Borscht (Cold Borscht)

June 26th, 2010 in Cold Soups, Soup Recipes by Julia Volhina

Are you suffering from hot weather like me? When outside feels like in the oven there is no better food to eat than cold soup. Lithuanian borscht is a nice refreshing buttermilk based cold soup you can put together without any extra hassle and then enjoy it sitting on the patio.

The real trick to Lithuanian borscht is to find good kefir – it should be original kefir which hasn’t been flavored with any tastes, not salted and not sweetened. I used plain unsweetened kefir (can be replaced with buttermilk) from Lifeway and it worked out perfectly.

The rest of ingredients: vegetables (beets, cucumber and greens) and hard boiled eggs, are easy to get and not pricey at all. And btw, even though this soup is called a “borscht”, the only thing it has in common to other borschts, I guess, is the color.

Lenten Borscht with Mushroom Dumplings

December 12th, 2009 in Hot Soups, Soup Recipes by Julia Volhina

In a lot of countries Christmas Eve dinner gathers whole family around one big table. Borscht with mushroom dumplings is the one of 12 dishes which usually are on that table by tradition in West Ukraine (by the way those dumplings are called “vushka” in ukrainian, which means “small ears”, I guess because of the shape).

Of course, because that is the Christmas Eve and Nativity Fast isn’t finished yet there is no meat used to prepare it: just vegetables and dried mushrooms. This borscht like the rest of the Christmas Eve’s traditional food is lenten, it is very tasty and isn’t heavy at all – most of the vegetables are used to prepare clear broth only and don’t get served with the borscht itself.

At first glance, it may look like cooking it is a bit of a hassle and time spending: so many steps (I’ve prepared 34 step-by-step pictures for this recipe!) and so many manipulations with different cooking utensils. However, you can complete preparation steps a day in advance – for example soak mushrooms, boil them or/and boil beets, you can even make dumplings a day before, freeze them and prepare the borscht next day. And then, nobody said you need to make everything yourself: involve your family into helping you! And have a Marry Christmas!