My milk recipes



Rice, Milk and Raisins Porridge

April 12th, 2014 in Main Dish Recipes, No-meat by Julia Volhina

This is a breakfast food of my childhood: soft rice porridge cooked with milk and sweet raisins.

Round kinds of rice will probably work better for it, but any white rice will do.

Cook porridge on slow simmer. Don’t forget to stir while cooking, to prevent rice from sticking to the bottom of the pot and burn.

Amount of milk to use for this recipe will vary depending on kind of rice and how liquid you like your porridge to be. I used exactly 2 cups.

Pumpkin and Millet Porridge

October 19th, 2013 in Main Dish Recipes, No-meat by Julia Volhina

I think pumpkin porridge (“garbuzova kasha” or “tykvennaja kasha”) is somewhat unusual dish in this part of the globe.

But it is quite popular in slavic world. My grandma always cooked it at fall, with milk and millet and, of course, pumpkin.

Raisins are nice addition to the recipe, all though they are optional, so are walnuts or dried apricots.

Cooking millet may take some time (and liquid). If you need to speed things up a bit, rinse millet seeds in couple of changes of warm water, or even let them soak in water for some time before cooking.

Chicken Kiev Cutlets

August 31st, 2013 in Chicken, Main Dish Recipes by Julia Volhina

This is one of recipes of ukrainian cuisine, after all it is named after capital of Ukraine – Kiev / Kyiv, but it is pretty popular through rest of former USSR countries.

Chicken Kiev is no ordinary recipe, but definitely one worth time spent: tender chicken meat folded around herb butter, covered in breadcrumbs and egg batter and cooked.

The trick is to fold meat and coat cutlets in batter in a way that herb butter doesn’t leak through holes while deep frying.

Potato and Mushroom Stuffed Dumplings

March 9th, 2013 in Main Dish Recipes, No-meat by Julia Volhina

I am maybe getting old: firstly I was putting off this recipe for far too long, secondly after I finished up with assembling these dumplings, I could feel my back.

Nevertheless here is recipe: ukrainian handmade dumplings stuffed with potato and mushroom mix.

You can boil them as soon as they are assembled, or you can freeze them up and boil right before serving. No thawing in necessary.

Already boiled dumplings can be warmed up on a skillet with a bit of butter.

Fried Chicken Liver with Onions

February 16th, 2013 in Chicken, Main Dish Recipes by Julia Volhina

Dusting chicken liver with flour and frying it with onions is perhaps easiest way to cook it.

Step of soaking live in milk can be skipped; it is optional, but it helps to reduce bitter taste liver may have.

The best side dish for this one, to my opinion, is plain boiled potato or potato puree.

Yeast Pancakes (Russian Oladi)

September 22nd, 2012 in Main Dish Recipes, No-meat by Julia Volhina

Using yeast in batter is pretty common in Russian cuisine. They not only make batter fluffy but gives it a distinctive taste.

Yeast are very picky about temperature: if it is too cold yeast will not start fermenting and if it is too hot yeast will die. Temperature of mixture should be warm and stable.

That is why I usually set my plastic mixing bowl in a cooking pot filled with hot water and I make sure bowl doesn’t touch water so it isn’t too hot to ensure comfortable conditions for yeast to ferment.

Consistency of the oladi batter should be a bit more stiff than kefir. If you fry pancakes and they don’t rise upon frying that may mean the batter is too liquid, to fix it mix in a bit more flour and let batter rise for 10-15 mins before trying again.

Cauliflower and Chicken Soup

August 18th, 2012 in Hot Soups, Soup Recipes by Julia Volhina

Unusual soup (at least for me): cauliflower florets and with tender chicken boiled in chicken broth and milk thickened with semolina flour.

It requires much less work to prepare that usual soup do: boil chicken and cauliflower and wait until they all become soft to taste. Not much peeling, blanching, slicing, dicing, etc.

You can adjust thickness of the soup by varying amount of water, milk and semolina flour. Add mozzarella directly to a serving bowl if you like taste of melted cheese, or skip it all together if you want to make soup skinnier.