EnjoyYourCooking

My Homemade Food Recipes & Tips

Tag: peas (Page 1 of 2)

Ham, Pineapple and Peas Salad

April 5th, 2014 in Salads by Julia Volhina
Ham, Pineapple and Peas Salad

This salad has interesting combination of ingredients: sweet peas with pineapples and ham (or canadian bacon) mixed with lettuce.

Freshly boiled peas can be substituted for canned peas on this one, but canned ones are some what easier to find.

Assemble salad right before you plan to serve it, lettuce will not keep freshness and crispness for long after slicing.

Fried Rice with Shrimps

December 28th, 2013 in Fish, Main Dishes by Julia Volhina
Fried Rice with Shrimps

One more recipe for fried rice, this time with shrimps.

As any fried rice, it is pretty easy and fast to cook, especially if you use frozen vegetables, just don’t forget to unfreeze them as well as shrimps in advance before cooking.

Most of the salt for this recipe comes from soy sauce, only eggs need a bit of additional salting.

Vegetables with Cream

December 14th, 2013 in No-meat, Sides by Julia Volhina
Vegetables with Cream

Vegetables with cream are pretty easy to cook and they make a great side dish for meat or poultry. It can also be served as a no-meat course.

I used carrots, broccoli and cauliflower florets with peas for this recipe, but it will also work good with green beans, zucchini, brussels sprouts, whatever you have on your hands.

The same, you can use either fresh vegetables or frozen ones, or a combination of these. For example, for this recipe I used fresh broccoli and cauliflower with frozen sliced carrots and frozen peas.

Veal Stew with Chanterelles and Peas

December 10th, 2011 in Beef, Main Dishes by Julia Volhina
Veal Stew with Chanterelles and Peas

Chanterelles are mushrooms which I simply can’t pass in the shop, even though they are seasonal or maybe because of that.

It is my shame, but I don’t know any way to prepare them other than this stew with veal and peas, but it sure tastes great!

You can substitute beef for veal, just increase cooking time to ensure meat is soft enough. You can also substitute white dry wine for water, if you feel like this.

Tomato and Rice Soup

April 16th, 2011 in Hot Soups, Soups by Julia Volhina
Tomato and Rice Soup

Gentle tomato soup with rice filling garnished with freshly chopped basil is a russian variant of tomato-basil soup.

It is beef broth based and if you want to make it more tomaty and thick, reduce amount of water you use for broth and increase amount of tomatoes.

I’ve garnished soup with basil even though it isn’t very widespread in Russia, but it gives a nice kick to flavor of this soup. After all basil and tomatoes are the combination which can never taste wrong.

Russian Lenten Mushroom Soup

February 19th, 2011 in Hot Soups, Soups by Julia Volhina
Russian Lenten Mushroom Soup

This soup doesn’t include any meat, it is based on mushrooms and have vegetables (carrot, parsley and celery roots, potato) as well as pearl barley.

Such kind of mushroom soup is very popular in Russia. Various kind of mushrooms can be used in this recipe, but I must say fresh or frozen porcini are the best tasting ones, if you can find them, of course.

If you are not trying to follow Great Lent rules – my advise is don’t skip on sour cream, 1 tablespoon of sour cream to the bowl of mushroom soup not only adds nutrients, but also gives the soup its unique rich taste.

Salad Dnister (Cabbage, Peas and Sausage)

September 25th, 2010 in Salads by Julia Volhina
Salad Dnister (Cabbage, Peas and Sausage)

Salad Dnister (just like a river) is a popular in West Ukraine dish originated in Carpathian mountains region, and made its way to other places as it is easy, not expensive and fast to do and very tasty.

Main ingredient of this salad is shredded cabbage, so you can consider it to be a coleslaw with a sausage and peas dressed with mayonnaise.

A bit of a challenge here would be to find suitable sausage. The closest translation to the kind of sausage you need I could come up with is “half-smoked summer sausage”, however I am pretty sure that sounds weird in english, and if you know how to call it better – please let me know. Krakowska or Ternopil’ska sausage will work here, if you can find any of those in Ukrainian or European shop.